Preliminary Program

Subject to revision
Monday
09:00 - 16:00 SRMGI Global Forum (by invtation only)

The SRM Governance Initiative (SRMGI) is an international, NGO-driven project for expanding the discussion of SRM climate engineering research governance to developing countries.

SRMGI will be holding a meeting – the SRMGI Global Forum – in conjunction with CEC17 in order to increase South-North dialogue over SRM. The Global Forum will take place in Berlin on the Monday prior to and the Friday following CEC17 and will bring together people from the workshops that SRMGI has held around the developing world. Invited participants of the SRMGI Global Forum will gather together to discuss the socio-political, ethical, and scientific dimensions of SRM research. They will also attend CEC17. This will give them an opportunity to connect with the SRM & CDR research community and to establish and strengthen personal connections, dialogue, and mutual learning.

The application period for the SRMGI Global Forum has now closed. However, there may be spaces available for people from developing countries who have not attended an SRMGI workshop but will be attending CEC17. Interested parties should email info@srmgi.org for more information. 

16:00 - 18:30 CEC17 Registration
18:30 - 22:00 CEC17 Opening Event + Reception
Tuesday
09:00 - 10:30 Plenary: SRM & CDR updates + ignite talks on major projects
This plenary session will update on key natural science findings & key social science developments on SRM & CDR, pointing interested listeners to individual sessions which will cover the topics in more detail. 
The overview talks will be followed by (major) project updates from individuals as ignite talks.
10:30 - 11:00 Break
11:00 - 12:30 Parallel Session: Communicating Climate Engineering

Come learn about the challenges of communicating climate engineering — and ways of dealing with them.  We’ll discuss lessons learned from communicating about climate change and emerging technologies, and how those apply to communicating about climate engineering with different audiences. 

Holly Jean Buck - Cornell University
11:00 - 12:30 Parallel Session: The Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project: Where have we been and where should we go?

GeoMIP is one of the largest CE research projects in the world.  What has it done, what is it planning to do, and is it meeting the needs of the broader CE research community?  We’re here to find out!

Ben Kravitz - Pacific Northwest National Laboratory , Helene Muri - University of Oslo , Maxime Plazzotta - Météo France
11:00 - 12:30 Parallel Session: A change of course: Radical emission reduction pathways to stay under 1.5°C

Climate change is not an engineering problem. There are many viable alternatives to bring our societies on a pathway towards 1.5°C without relying on geoengineering. A technofix mentality and powerful vested interests prevent us from implementing them. This session will explore how we can change course for a climate-just future.

Linda Schneider - Heinrich Böll Foundation
11:00 - 12:30 Parallel Session: Achieving the SDGs: Governing Geoengineering in a post-Paris world

Governance of climate geoengineering is a very challenging endeavor on many levels and may become a necessity given the level of demonstrated ambition to act. Come listen and contribute actively in a World Café  setting to what UN officials, policymakers, researchers, youth and civil society have to say about why geoengineering governance must be discussed in the context of urgent, accelerated mitigation efforts.

Janos Pasztor - Carnegie Climate Geoengineering Governance Initiative (C2G2)
12:30 - 14:00 Lunch
14:00 - 15:30 Parallel Session: The economics of climate engineering: The recent past and the road ahead

Economic methods are crucial for for both normative and descriptive assessments of Climate Engineering (both SRM and CDR). This session gives an overview of the current state of economic knowledge and offers room for discussing where the field should move from here.

Daniel Heyen - London School of Economics , Tobias Pfrommer - Ruprecht-Karls-University Heidelberg
14:00 - 15:30 Parallel Session: SRMGI1

Partnership with the SRMGI Global Forum is going to be one of the unique features of CEC17. The Global Forum will bring to Berlin 40-50 SRMGI meeting participants from around the developing world, where for two days they will work together to consider the next steps for developing country engagement with SRM research and its governance.  Because the Global Forum participants have not yet been selected, they have not had the chance to submit session proposals to CEC. Therefore two session slots have been left open for SRMGI participants to propose sessions for. One possibility suggested by the steering group would be a mixer event, where SRMGI participants can meet with established SRM researchers to explore the possibility for future collaboration.

Andy Parker - Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies (IASS) Potsdam
14:00 - 15:30 Parallel session: God(s) and Greenhouse Gases: Religion and Climate Engineering

Religions have insights on new technologies; don’t you wonder what religions may have to say about climate engineering, and whether they would help us ask important questions about this topic? It goes way beyond “playing God” to questions of harmony, agency, and justice.

Forrest Clingerman - Ohio Northern University
14:00 - 15:30 Parallel Session:Public Engagement & Climate Engineering: Whither and How?

It is widely acknowledged that engaging a wider range of people in conversations about climate engineering is desirable. Rather than reporting out specific insights derived from existing public engagement work, this panel will step back, addressing issues related to the rationales, promises, and challenges associated with public engagements in this domain more generally.

Michael Thompson - FCEA , Jane Flegal - UC Berkeley
15:30 - 16:00 Break
16:00 - 17:30 Paralell Session: To Gabon or not to Gabon: A game on geoengineering research and policy

Join us for an intensely interactive session. We will use a playable system dynamics model of the changing relationships between information, decisions and consequences to explore the individual and collective options or managing climate risks. There will be winners and losers, and prizes. Most importantly, there will be serious fun in the context of rich, realistic discussions about our current and future choices.

Pablo Suarez - Red Cross Red Crescent Climate Centre
16:00 - 17:30 Parallel Session: Security Risk Pathways of Climate Engineering and Counter-Geoengineering: Conflict or Cooperation?

The session discusses whether climate engineering (CE) may lead to security risks and conflicts or whether it will rather promote cooperation and governance. As an example we discuss in detail whether counter-geoengineering (the release of neutralizing particles or of potent greenhouse gases) poses additional risk or can help overcome the free-driver problem. 

Jürgen Scheffran - Universität Hamburg
16:00 - 17:30 Parallel Session: Policy options and principles for negative emissions and SRM

Climate engineering is not emerging in a policy vacuum: We discuss specific proposals to apply established principles, policy goals and policy instruments to climate engineering deployment including under the Paris Agreement and in context of human rights law and the sustainable development goals.

Matthias Honegger - Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies (IASS) Potsdam
16:00 - 17:30 Parallel Session: Key Elements of Responsible Geoengineering Research

Plausible IPCC scenarios require intentional climate intervention to stay below 1.5/2 degrees C, and geoengineering research may commence soon.  Responsible research should simultaneously develop governance capacity. This session will discuss what such responsible research will require: international responsibilities, dealing with risk perception and public engagement, systematic research agendas and reliable institutional design.

Jane C.S. Long - Retired
17:30 - 18:30 Transfer to House of World Cultures
18:30 - 22:30 Panel discussion at House of World Cultures
Wednesday
09:00 - 10:30 Parallel Session: Trumped! A new politics of climate engineering?

The world faces political as well as environmental disruption. Academics tend to make rational-actor assumptions while bracketing the wilder, unpredictable aspects of politics. We will explore implications for national and international politics of climate engineering of the Trump administration’s brand of climate denialism and other turns towards populism and authoritarianism.

Duncan McLaren - Lancaster Environment Centre
09:00 - 10:30 Parallel Session: Solar climate engineering: What goes up must come down

What goes up must come down. If we pump particles into the stratosphere, how will that effect air quality at the ground level? Solar geoengineering may also reduce the self-cleansing capacity of the near-surface atmosphere, allowing pollution to build up.  Alternatively, some aspects of air pollution may actually be reduced.

Tim Butler - Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies (IASS) & Freie Universität Berlin
09:00 - 10:30 Parallel Session: Climate engineering governance: National, subnational, and European law & policy

Most legal scholarship concerning climate engineering has remained within the international domain. Yet national, subnational, and European law & policy will likely be relevant sooner and will be more applicable. This session will clarify the relationship between these forms of law & policy and both solar and carbon climate engineering.

Jesse Reynolds - Utrecht University , Tracy Hester - University of Houston , Anthony Chavez - Northern Kentucky University
09:00 - 10:30 Parallel Session: SRM, meaning and conduct in the Anthropocene (TBC)

Session description to follow. 

Oliver Morton - The Economist
10:30 - 11:00 Break
11:00 - 12:30 Parallel Session: Interdisciplinary CDR

Methods to remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere impact on a range of physical and human systems and are intertwined with mitigation and adaptation approaches through land use, food systems, energy policy and water quality. There are a number of trade-offs, implications, risks and opportunities for different CDR methods and approaches that may influence the feasibility of large scale deployment of such techniques. Crucial bottlenecks or co-benefits of particular combinations of CDR, mitigation and adaptation strategies may play a crucial role in realising large scale CDR implementation and are important to identify.  This session invites submissions that cover all forms of CDR and a range of disciplinary perspectives from policy to public perceptions to physical science and human system impacts.  

Naomi Vaughan - University of East Anglia
11:00 - 12:30 Parallel Session: Rational Choice and Worst Case Scenarios

If there is one moral argument that looms large against the prospects for Geoengineering it is the Precautionary Principle. In this session, the aim is to put this argument in a broader context in which all “facts” established via the scientific method are always open to falsification and hence cannot be known with certainty.

 

Talks:

  • Martin Bunzl - SRM Risk and the problem of uncertainty
  • Ortwin Renn - Geoengineered Black Swans?
  • Douglas MacMartin - How uncertain is solar geoengineering?
  • David Keith - Solar geoengineering in a risk analysis framework
Martin Bunzl - Rutgers University , Douglas MacMartin - Cornell University , David Keith - Harvard University , Prof. Dr. Ortwin Renn - Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies (IASS) Potsdam
11:00 - 12:30 Parallel Session: Changes of Stratospheric Chemistry and Dynamics and it’s impacts as a result of climate change and stratospheric aerosol climate engineering

Stratospheric aerosol climate engineering and climate change are both expected to change stratospheric dynamics and chemistry. These changes may result in both an increase and decrease of column ozone depending on injection location, amount and timing, which impacts surface UV radiation. How large will these changes be and can we comprehensively assessed these changes and aim to reduce them?

Simone Tilmes - National Center for Atmospheric Research
11:00 - 12:30 Parallel Session: Teaching Climate Engineering

A series of informal, small-group discussions about people’s experiences teaching about climate engineering, sharing stories about successes, challenges, student or audience reactions, approaches that have worked (or not) in different contexts, and specific assignments or learning activities. People who have not yet taught about climate engineering are welcome.

David Morrow - American University/Forum for Climate Engineering Assessment
12:30 - 14:00 Lunch
14:00 - 15:30 Plenary: Research Governance World Café

This plenary aims to bring together members of the SRM & CDR research community with those involved in governance intitatives to discuss broader issues related to responsible innovation and research governance. The World Café format will allow interactive discussions on a range of research governance related questions. 

Edward (Ted) Parson - UCLA
15:30 - 16:00 Break
16:00 - 17:30 Plenary: SRM Experiments Campfire

Our team is interested in conducting one of the first outdoor solar geoengineering experiments in the U.S. (possibly within a year or two). Public engagement, of course, is essential. This session will provide an opportunity for researchers to engage on the substance of the experiment and to discuss broader engagement.

David Keith - Harvard University
17:30 - 18:00 Break
18:00 - 19:30 Poster session + drinks
19:30 Evening event (TBC)
Thursday
09:00 - 10:30 Parallel Session: SRMGI 2

Partnership with the SRMGI Global Forum is going to be one of the unique features of CEC17. The Global Forum will bring to Berlin 40-50 SRMGI meeting participants from around the developing world, where for two days they will work together to consider the next steps for developing country engagement with SRM research and its governance.  Because the Global Forum participants have not yet been selected, they have not had the chance to submit session proposals to CEC. Therefore two session slots have been left open for SRMGI participants to propose sessions for. One possibility suggested by the steering group would be a mixer event, where SRMGI participants can meet with established SRM researchers to explore the possibility for future collaboration.

Andy Parker - Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies (IASS) Potsdam
09:00 - 10:30 Parallell Session: Geoengineering and the Arctic

The Arctic is experiencing some of the most rapid climate change of anywhere in the world.  Offsetting these changes has been the explicit target of multiple geoengineering proposals.  The potential effects of climate change and geoengineering would impact the people and natural resources of this sensitive region and would have knock-on effects for numerous areas throughout the rest of the world.
In this session, we explore the broad scope of geoengineering and the Arctic.  We welcome proposals in a wide variety of areas, including technologies that are designed to be deployed in or directly impact the Arctic, natural and social science research on the effects and impacts of geoengineering on the Arctic, and the geopolitical role of the Arctic.  Submissions relating to SRM, CDR, or any other category of geoengineering are welcome.

Ben Kravitz - Pacific Northwest National Laboratory , Ulrike Lohmann - ETH Zurich , David Mitchell - Desert Research Institute
09:00 - 10:30 Parallel Session: Two pathways for Sulphate Aerosol Injection. Towards conditions of ethically defensible research and deployment

Based on two stylised Sulphate Aerosol Injection (SAI) deployment scenarios (“emergency” and “peak shaving”), this session investigates under which conditions SAI research and deployment can be ethically defensible (permissible or mandatory). The session also considers what this implies for present policy making and research programs.

Konrad Ott - Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel
09:00 - 10:30 Parallel Session: CE assessment metrics – Comparative, Integrative, Comprehensive
To enable fair, comprehensive and comparative decision-making on Climate Engineering, we need to foster a multidisciplinary and integrative selection process for assessment metrics. In this session we want to learn to what extent established climate-change assessment metrics are applicable for Climate Engineering assessment and what kind of extensions are needed.
 
This session aims to foster discussions about approaches to comparatively assess different climate engineering (CE) ideas, both among each other and in the context of mitigation. We encourage contributions that address the following questions:
  • How can effects of SRM and CDR methods be compared with each other and with classical mitigation approaches?
  • Which indicators are useful for a comprehensive assessment of SRM and CDR methods?
  • To what extent are structurally new metrics compared to global warming mitigation assessment metrics needed for CE?
  • How can uncertainty be treated explicitly in metrics design?
  • What new challenges arise for the assessment process when different CE methods are combined?
  • How to select indicators for a fair and comprehensive comparison of different CE methods?
  • How to ensure societal relevance of the assessment criteria?
  • How should stakeholders co-shape the design of metrics?
Note: Hermann Held, while playing a lead role in co-convening this session, is unfortunately not able to attend in person.
 
 
Nadine Mengis - Concordia University , Sebastian Sonntag - Max Planck Institute for Meteorology , Elnaz Roshan - Universität Hamburg, International Max Planck Research School on Earth System Modeling , Hermann Held - Universität Hamburg , Andreas Oschlies - GEOMAR Kiel , Wilfired Rickels - Institut für Weltwirtschaft Kiel
10:30 - 11:00 Break
11:00 - 12:30 Parallel Session: The Earth System and Carbon Dioxide Removal

Scenarios limiting warming to <2°C rely heavily on Carbon Dioxide Removal. Despite this many key questions around potential efficacy, impacts and feedbacks of different proposed CDR methods remain unanswered. Our session explores the response of the Earth System, i.e., the climate system, biosphere, and the carbon cycle, to proposed CDR.

David P. Keller - GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel
11:00 - 12:30 Parallel Session: A Review of the Recommendations of the Academic Working Group on International Governance of Climate Engineering

The Academic Working Group on International Governance of Climate Engineering (AWG) has been meeting across a series of workshops to take a fresh, authoritative look at international governance pathways for solar geoengineering. This will be the first public discussion of their preliminary findings and recommendations. Members of the AWG will present their draft report, followed by commentary from 3-4 report reviewers. Audience questions and feedback will be encouraged.

Simon Nicholson - American University
11:00 - 12:30 Parallel Session: Modeling, imagining, and making the future in climate engineering

When it comes to engineering planetary sunshades or carbon sinks, there is no crystal ball. But economists, climate modelers, scholars of technology governance, and futurists have generated numerous methods by which to explore the future: from simulating natural or societal dynamics in models, to horizon-scanning surveys that generate educated speculation, to scenarios that imagine experimental depictions of an engineered climate. But each method comes with different objectives, ‘ways of knowing’ the future, communities of usage, and access to decision-making processes. Separately, how can we compare them? As a whole, how is knowledge and decision-making - on potentially game-changing technologies that don’t exist – better served? Are we predicting the future, exploring possibilities, presenting alternatives, or setting our own conceptions of the future into play?

Sean Low - Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies (IASS) Potsdam
11:00 - 12:30 Parallel Session: Social Movements & Climate Engineering Justice from the Periphery

Debate around the justice of geoengineering has often, implicitly or explicitly, assumed the perspective of high-emitting groups that are disproportionately responsible for geoengineering research. We should re-orient our normative thinking regarding climate engineering research, governance, and deployment to include the agency and perspectives of the global South and subaltern groups .We will convene global representatives from diverse social movements to lead intersectional discussions on what geoengineering means for racial and environmental justice, food sovereignty, youth, gender, health and global justice as well as climate justice.

Patrick Taylor-Smith - National University Singapore
12:30 - 14:00 Lunch
14:00 - 15:30 Parallel Session: Putting the ‘Engineering’ in Solar & Carbon Climate Engineering Approaches

Modifying Earth’s climate is one of the largest proposed activities in history. Designing, constructing, and managing such a large endeavor will require engineering. We explore engineering questions from both a systems and deployment perspective and how they can inform the science of SRM and CDR climate engineering.

Ben Kravitz - Pacific Northwest National Laboratory , David Keith - Harvard University
14:00 - 15:30 Parallel Session: Campfire Sessions on a Code of Conduct for Geoengineering Research

It is essential that geoengineering research is appropriately governed to ensure that any such research is conducted safely and in a socially responsible and equitable manner. This session will describe initial work by the Geoengineering Research Governance Project (GRGP) http://ucalgary.c/grgproject/ on developing a draft Code of Conduct for geoengineering research and will actively invite comment and discussion about potential next steps.

Anna-Maria Hubert - University of Calgary
14:00 - 15:30 Parallel Session: Performative Experiments in Geoengineering

When artists perform experiments they elicit very different responses from the public than when scientists do. Our panel, Performative Experiments in Geoengineering, opens up a space for transdisciplinary conversation engaging conference participants in the performance and observation of a small scale artistic experiment that maps choreographies and protocols of the climate engineering field: a staging of a performance and observation of an experiment depicted in the painting ‘Experiment on a bird in the air pump.’

Karolina Sobecka - Interdisciplinary artist
14:00 - 15:30 Parallel Session: Climate Engineering Research Starting and Stopping Rules

Research advocates will be asked to present a brief discussion of what they would consider ‘stopping rules’ or conditions under which they would consider ceasing research into climate engineering approaches. Subsequently, research critics/opponents will be asked to present what they consider ‘starting rules’ or conditions that would make them advocate research. This will be followed by an open discussion round.

David Keith - Harvard University , Clare Heyward - University of Warwick
15:30 - 16:00 Break
16:00 - 17:30 Town Hall: Looking forward
Friday
09:00 - 18:30 SRMGI Global Forum (by invtation only)

The SRM Governance Initiative (SRMGI) is an international, NGO-driven project for expanding the discussion of SRM climate engineering research governance to developing countries.

SRMGI will be holding a meeting – the SRMGI Global Forum – in conjunction with CEC17 in order to increase South-North dialogue over SRM. The Global Forum will take place in Berlin on the Monday prior to and the Friday following CEC17 and will bring together people from the workshops that SRMGI has held around the developing world. Invited participants of the SRMGI Global Forum will gather together to discuss the socio-political, ethical, and scientific dimensions of SRM research. They will also attend CEC17. This will give them an opportunity to connect with the SRM & CDR research community and to establish and strengthen personal connections, dialogue, and mutual learning.

The application period for the SRMGI Global Forum has now closed. However, there may be spaces available for people from developing countries who have not attended an SRMGI workshop but will be attending CEC17. Interested parties should email info@srmgi.org for more information.