Parallel Session 1.12: Key Elements of Responsible Geoengineering Research

Tuesday, 16:00 - 17:30
02 I Elysium

Plausible IPCC scenarios require intentional climate intervention to stay below 1.5/2 degrees C, and geoengineering research may commence soon. Responsible research should simultaneously develop governance capacity. This session will discuss what such responsible research will require: Activities to allow legitimate decision making, enabling reliable research, and control over experimentation.

Convened by: 

Jane C.S. Long

Organisation: 
Retired, formerly Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
Country: 
United States of America

Dr. Long was chair of the Task Force on Geoengineering for the Bipartisan Policy Center and chairman of the California Council on Science and Technology’s California’s Energy Future committee.  She serves on the board of directors for the Clean Air Task Force, the Center for Sustainable Shale Development, the Bay Area Air Quality Management District Advisory Board, the Forum for Climate Engineering Assessment Advisory Board, and the Center for Carbon Removal Advisory Board.

Dr. Long recently retired from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory where she was the Principal Associate Director at Large, Fellow in the LLNL Center for Global Strategic Research and the Associate Director for Energy and Environment. She is currently a senior contributing scientist for the Environmental Defense Fund and was the Dean of the Mackay School of Mines, University of Nevada, Reno and Department Chair for the Energy Resources Technology and the Environmental Research Departments at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. 

Dr. Long holds a bachelor’s degree in engineering from Brown University and Masters and PhD from U. C. Berkeley, is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and was named Alum of the Year in 2012 by the Brown University School of Engineering. Dr. Long is an Associate of the National Academies of Science (NAS) and a Senior Fellow and council member of the California Council on Science and Technology (CCST) and the Breakthrough Institute.

 

Steven Hamburg

Organisation: 
Environmental Defense Fund (EDF)
Country: 
USA

In his role as chief scientist Steven Hamburg works to ensure that EDF’s advocacy is based on the best available science. He is currently coordinating studies on methane emissions from the global natural gas supply chain. Prior to joining EDF he spent 25 years on the faculties of Brown University and the University of Kansas and served as a lead author for the IPCC and other panels and review bodies. He has published more than 100 scholarly papers on biogeochemistry, climate change impacts on forests and carbon accounting. He currently co‐chairs the Solar Radiation Management Governance Initiative (joint project of Royal Society, TWAS, EDF) and serves on US EPA’ Science Advisory Board, NAS’ Board on Environmental Science and Toxicology as well as many university/government advisory boards.

Speakers: 

Janos Pasztor

Organisation: 
Carnegie Climate Geoengineering Governance Initiative (C2G2)
Country: 
Hungary

Janos Pasztor (Born in Budapest, 4.4.1955) is currently Senior Fellow and Executive Director of the Carnegie Climate Geoengineering Governance Initiative (C2G2) at the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs. He has over 35 years of work experience in the areas of energy, environment, climate change and sustainable development.  Before taking up his current assignment he was UN Assistant Secretary-General for Climate Change in New York under Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon. 

Earlier, he was Acting Executive Director for Conservation (2014) and Policy and Science Director (2012-2014) at WWF International.  He directed the UNSG’s Climate Change Support Team (2008-2010) and later was Executive Secretary of the UNSG’s High-level Panel on Global Sustainability (2010-2012).  In 2007 he directed the Geneva-based UN Environment Management Group (EMG).  During 1993-2006 he worked, and over time held many responsibilities at the Climate Change Secretariat (UNFCCC), initially in Geneva and later in Bonn.

His other assignments included: in the Secretariat of the 1992 UN Conference on Environment and Development (Earth Summit ’92); Stockholm Environment Institute; United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP); Secretariat of the World Commission on Environment and Development (Brundtland Commission); the Beijer Institute; and the World Council of Churches.

He has BSc and MSc degrees from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

Edward (Ted) Parson

Organisation: 
University of California, Los Angeles
Country: 
USA

Edward A. (Ted) Parson is Professor of Environmental Law and Faculty Co-Director of the Emmett Institute on Climate Change and the Environment at the University of California, Los Angeles.  Parson studies international environmental law and policy, the role of science and technology in policy-making, and the political economy of regulation. His most recent books are A Subtle Balance: Evidence, Expertise, and Democracy in Public Policy and Governance, 1970-2010 (McGill-Queens University Press, 2015), The Science and Politics of Global Climate Change (with Andrew Dessler) (2nd ed. Cambridge, 2010), and Protecting the Ozone Layer: Science and Strategy (Oxford, 2003).

Parson has led and served on multiple advisory committees, such as the National Academy of Sciences and the U.S. Global Change Research Program. In addition to his academic positions, Parson has worked for and consulted several political bodies including the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy and the U.N. Environment Program.  He holds degrees in physics from the University of Toronto and in management science from the University of British Columbia, and a Ph.D. in Public Policy from Harvard.  In former lives, he was a professional classical musician and an organizer of grass-roots environmental groups.

Douglas MacMartin

Organisation: 
Cornell University, California Institute of Technology
Country: 
United States of America

Douglas MacMartin splits his time between Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering at Cornell University, and Computing + Mathematical Sciences at the California Institute of Technology.  His research lies at the intersection between engineering feedback analysis and climate dynamics, with a primary focus on solar geoengineering – working to develop the knowledge base for society to make informed decisions.  In addition to applying engineering analysis to climate dynamics, he is also involved in control design for the Thirty Meter Telescope.  He received his Bachelors’ degree from the University of Toronto in 1987, and Ph.D. in Aeronautics and Astronautics from MIT in 1992; prior to joining Caltech in 2000, he led the active control research and development program at United Technologies Research Center.

Jane Flegal

Organisation: 
UC Berkeley & Forum for Climate Engineering Assessment
Country: 
USA

Jane Flegal is a PhD candidate in the Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management at UC Berkeley, where she is also affiliated with the Center for Science, Technology, Medicine, and Society and the Energy & Environment Policy Lab. Her research focuses on science and technology policy, in particular on the politics of science and expertise in the governance of emerging technologies. Jane is a Visiting Fellow at the School for the Future of Innovation in Society at Arizona State University in fall 2017. Prior to beginning her PhD, Jane worked as a Senior Policy Analyst at the Bipartisan Policy Center in Washington, DC, where she led research on climate engineering and federal energy innovation policy. She earned a BA in Environmental Studies & Politics from Mount Holyoke College in 2009.