Parallel Session: Security Risk Pathways of Climate Engineering and Counter-Geoengineering: Conflict or Cooperation?

16:00 - 17:30

The session discusses whether climate engineering (CE) may lead to security risks and conflicts or whether it will rather promote cooperation and governance. As an example we discuss in detail whether counter-geoengineering (the release of neutralizing particles or of potent greenhouse gases) poses additional risk or can help overcome the free-driver problem.

There will be two joint presentations by:

  1. Jürgen Scheffran, Jasmin S.A. Link, and P. Michael Link
  2. Daniel Heyen, Joshua Horton, and Juan Moren-Cruz
Convened by: 

Jürgen Scheffran

Organisation: 
Universität Hamburg
Country: 
Germany

Jürgen Scheffran is professor in geography at Universität Hamburg und head of the Research Group Climate Change and Security in the CliSAP Excellence Cluster and the Center for Earth System Research and Sustainability (CEN). He held positions at the University of Marburg, at Technical University of Darmstadt, the University of Illnois and the Potsdam Institute of Climate Impact Research. Research fields include: security risks and conflicts of climate change and climate engineering; energy security and energy landscapes; water-food-land nexus, human migration and rural-urban relations; human-environment interaction and sustainability science; technology assessment and international security.

Daniel Heyen

Organisation: 
London School of Economics
Country: 
United Kingdom

Daniel Heyen is a postdoctoral researcher in environmental economics. He is based at the Grantham Research Institute at the London School of Economics. His research focuses mainly on the role of uncertainty and learning in environmental decision-making and the intergenerational and strategic challenges raised by climate engineering technologies. Daniel holds a PhD in Economics from Heidelberg University.

Joshua Horton

Organisation: 
Harvard University
Country: 
USA

Joshua Horton is a Research Director for Geoengineering at the Harvard Kennedy School’s Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs. He manages and conducts research on solar geoengineering policy and governance, including regime design, decision-making, and geopolitics. Horton holds a Ph.D. in political science from Johns Hopkins University.

Jasmin S. A. Link

Organisation: 
University of Hamburg
Country: 
Germany

Dipl.-Math. Jasmin S. A. Link is a sociologist and mathematician working interdisciplinarily at the Research Group Climate Change and Security (CLISEC), which is part of the Center for Earth System Research and Sustainability (CEN) of the University of Hamburg, Germany. Her main research focus is Mathematical Sociology, with an emphasis on social path-dependent behavior under changing environmental conditions. On the basis of her work on the potential consequences of climate engineering deployment in the EuTRACE project while being hosted by the Max-Planck-Institute for Meteorology in Hamburg, Jasmin has generated transdisciplinary networks of potential consequences of CE that can impact the environmental system, natural resources, human health, and societal stability. Focusing on cascades of potential consequences of stratospheric aerosol injections (SAI), Jasmin emphasizes the important role of transdisciplinary feedback loops. And even for deployment of bioenergy and carbon capture and storage (BECCS), implications on human health as well as risks for economic or social security and biodiversity can be deduced from the related network.
Jasmin S. A. Link (née Kominek) has published several peer-reviewed articles and book chapters on societal impacts of climate change and human-environment interaction. Furthermore, she is co-founder and former board member of the Young Researchers Network on Complex Systems (YRNCS).

Juan Moreno-Cruz

Organisation: 
Georgia Tech School of Economics
Country: 
USA

Juan Moreno-Cruz is an Associate Professor in the School of Economics at Georgia Institute of Technology. He earned his Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Calgary in Canada, and his B.Sc. and M.Sc. in Electrical Engineering from the Universidad de Los Andes in Colombia. Moreno-Cruz arrived to Georgia Tech in August 2011, where he has worked on energy and environmental economics, in particular on questions related to climate change and energy transitions. He was recently awarded a grant from the National Academy of Sciences to work on spatial energy consumption and regional air quality. His work has influenced the direction of geoengineering research and policy and has been published in high impact journals such as Nature GeosciencesPNASScienceClimatic ChangeEnergy and Environmental Economics, and Resource and Energy Economics. Moreno-Cruz is also a Brook Byers Institute for Sustainable Systems Fellow and a Kavli Frontiers of Science Fellow.